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Progress In Electromagnetics Research B
ISSN: 1937-6472
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EMC MODEL-BASED TEST-SETUP OF AN ELECTRICAL SYSTEM

By I. Sharaa, D. N. Aloi, and H. P. Gerl

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Abstract:
The increased number of electronic systems in today's car designs requires that each system is EMC compliant prior to vehicle assembly. Each system or component auto supplier is mandated to perform system level EMC testing according to the car manufacturer standards. To ensure high functional integrity of these systems, EMC modeling and simulation are used as a tool. This paper provides an EMC model of a general automotive electrical system. The purpose is to measure, model, and simulate radiated emissions of a test-setup that consists of an electronic control unit ECU, harness, and a load. The model then can be used to optimize the overall system design to achieve EMC compliance or provide a directional improvement to obtain an optimum performance to save cost.

Lab measurements are conducted and EMC model is developed according to CISPR25 standards. The model of the printed circuit board PCB and cable harness is accomplished using modeling tools with built-in modeling techniques such as 2D MoM and 3D PEEC. IBIS wave models and SPICE models are connected to simulate circuits and harnesses in time or frequency domain. During simulation, the geometric and electric data are stored together for radiation analysis.

Citation:
I. Sharaa, D. N. Aloi, and H. P. Gerl, "EMC Model-Based Test-Setup of an Electrical System," Progress In Electromagnetics Research B, Vol. 11, 133-154, 2009.
doi:10.2528/PIERB08110307

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